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Archive for May, 2013

On Thursday May 23, 2013 moments prior to Congress leaving town for a long week-end (Memorial Day), Obama attempted to distract America from his three scandals but in fact created #4.  As if choreographed by Johnson County’s ballet dancing, we have a President on tip-toes wading through a pile of chicken poop, from Henpecked Acres.

http://www.politicususa.com/obama-masterfully-code-pink-heckler-case-gitmo-closed.html

Obama Masterfully Uses Code Pink Heckler To Make His Case That GITMO Must Be Closed

By: Jason Easley    May 23, 2013

A Code Pink heckler thought she was protesting the president, but in reality she helped President Obama make his case that GITMO must be closed immediately.

Video:

Obama was explaining that there was no justification for Congress to prevent him from closing GITMO, when a Code Pink heckler interrupted him. The president said, “Let me finish ma’am.” The heckler started ranting about the detainee hunger strike, and the president replied, “I’m about to address it ma’am, but you’ve got to let me speak. I’m about to address it ma’am. Why don’t you sit down, and I’ll tell you exactly what I am going to do.” The Code Pink heckler was incorrectly claiming that Obama is Commander in Chief so he can close GITMO. This is true, but the president needs funding from Congress in order to close the facility, and move the detainees. Congress continues to refuse to fund the closure of GITMO.

The Code Pinker wasn’t going to swayed by anything that the president had to say, so she continued to rant. Finally, the president said, “Thank you. Thank you, ma’am. You should let me finish my sentence. Today, I once again call on Congress to lift the restrictions on detainee transfers from GITMO.” The protester who has been identified as Medea Benjamin interrupted the president a third time. His patience wearing thin, the president said, “Part of free speech is you being able to speak, but also me being able to speak. And you listening.”

Obama later said that he cut her some slack with her interruptions, and admitted that she had a point. The president also mentioned that he thought Benjamin wasn’t listening to a word he said.

Do you want to know why President Obama let her speak? This is going to come as a shock to the far left, but Obama agrees with her on the basic idea that GITMO must be closed. By letting the Code Pink protester ramble on, President Obama got his message about Congress needing to authorize the transfer of detainees out of GITMO on the frontpage of every website, and it will be the lead story all over cable news tonight.

Code Pink has been grossly misinformed, as has much of the far left, about the political maneuverings that have resulting in Congress blocking the closure of GITMO. They want to blame Obama, because as Benjamin put it, he is the commander in chief. Their childlike naive view of presidential power is that the president can do anything, but that’s not the way it works.

In March, Republicans admitted that they are the ones who are preventing GITMO civilian trials, yet groups like Code Pink continue to blame Obama.

The president needs funding in order to close the facility and move the detainees. Congress refuses to grant that funding. Obama has been down this road numerous times on GITMO. He gets everything ready to close the facility and move the detainees, only to see Congress refuses to fund it.

Obama handled the heckler beautifully, and the whole thing worked out to his advantage, because now the world will get to see who is really preventing the closure GITMO.

Since 2009, congressional Democrats have repeatedly screwed Obama by refusing to close GITMO. If Code Pink and the rest of the far left want to protest those responsible for GITMO still being open, they should start with Harry Reid.

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Agenda 21 – Chapter 21

ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND MANAGEMENT OF SOLID WASTES AND

SEWAGE-RELATED ISSUES

21.1. This chapter has been incorporated in Agenda 21 in response to General Assembly resolution 44/228, section I, paragraph 3, in which the Assembly affirmed that the Conference should elaborate strategies and measures to halt and reverse the effects of environmental degradation in the context of increased national and international efforts to promote sustainable and environmentally sound development in all countries, and to section I, paragraph 12 (g), of the same resolution, in which the Assembly affirmed that environmentally sound management of wastes was among the environmental issues of major concern in maintaining the quality of the Earth’s environment and especially in achieving environmentally sound and sustainable development in all countries.

21.2. Programme areas included in the present chapter of Agenda 21 are closely related to the following programme areas of other chapters of Agenda 21:

a. Protection of the quality and supply of freshwater resources: application of integrated approaches to the development, management and use of water resources (chapter 18);

b. Promoting sustainable human settlement development (chapter 7);

c. Protecting and promoting human health conditions (chapter 6);

d. Changing consumption patterns (chapter 4).

21.3. Solid wastes, as defined in this chapter, include all domestic refuse and non-hazardous wastes such as commercial and institutional wastes, street sweepings and construction debris. In some countries, the solid wastes management system also handles human wastes such as night -soil, ashes from incinerators, septic tank sludge and sludge from sewage treatment plants. If these wastes manifest hazardous characteristics they should be treated as hazardous wastes.

21.4. Environmentally sound waste management must go beyond the mere safe disposal or recovery of wastes that are generated and seek to address the root cause of the problem by attempting to change unsustainable patterns of production and consumption. This implies the application of the integrated life cycle management concept, which presents a unique opportunity to reconcile development with environmental protection.

21.5. Accordingly, the framework for requisite action should be founded on a hierarchy of objectives and focused on the four major waste-related programme areas, as follows:

a. Minimizing wastes;

b. Maximizing environmentally sound waste reuse and recycling;

c. Promoting environmentally sound waste disposal and treatment;

d. Extending waste service coverage.

21.6. The four programme areas are interrelated and mutually supportive and must therefore be integrated in order to provide a comprehensive and environmentally responsive framework for managing municipal solid wastes. The mix and emphasis given to each of the four programme areas will vary according to the local socio-economic and physical conditions, rates of waste generation and waste composition. All sectors of society should participate in all the programme areas.

PROGRAMME AREAS

A. Minimizing wastes

Basis for action

21.7. Unsustainable patterns of production and consumption are increasing the quantities and variety of environmentally persistent wastes at unprecedented rates. The trend could significantly increase the quantities of wastes produced by the end of the century and increase quantities four to fivefold by the year 2025. A preventive waste management approach focused on changes in lifestyles and in production and consumption patterns offers the best chance for reversing current trends.

Objectives

21.8. The objectives in this area are:

a. To stabilize or reduce the production of wastes destined for final disposal, over an agreed time-frame, by formulating goals based on waste weight, volume and composition and to induce separation to facilitate waste recycling and reuse;

b. To strengthen procedures for assessing waste quantity and composition changes for the purpose of formulating operational waste minimization policies utilizing economic or other instruments to induce beneficial modifications of production and consumption patterns.

21.9. Governments, according to their capacities and available resources and with t he cooperation of the United Nations and other relevant organizations, as appropriate, should:

a. By the year 2000, ensure sufficient national, regional and international capacity to access, process and monitor waste trend information and implement waste minimization policies;

b. By the year 2000, have in place in all industrialized countries programmes to stabilize or reduce, if practicable, production of wastes destined for final disposal, including per capita wastes (where this concept applies), at the level prevailing at that date; developing countries as well should work towards that goal without jeopardizing their development prospects;

c. Apply by the year 2000, in all countries, in particular in industrialized countries, programmes to reduce the production of agrochemical wastes, containers and packaging materials, which do not meet hazardous characteristics.

Activities

(a) Management-related activities

21.10. Governments should initiate programmes to achieve sustained minimization of waste generation. Non-governmental organizations and consumer groups should be encouraged to participate in such programmes, which could be drawn up with the cooperation of international organizations, where necessary. These programmes should, wherever possible, build upon existing or planned activities and should:

a. Develop and strengthen national capacities in research and design of environmentally sound technologies, as well as adopt measures to reduce wastes to a minimum;

b. Provide for incentives to reduce unsustainable patterns of production and consumption;

c. Develop, where necessary, national plans to minimize waste generation as part of overall national development plans;

d. Emphasize waste minimization considerations in procurement within the United Nations system.

(b) Data and information

21.11. Monitoring is a key prerequisite for keeping track of changes in waste quantity and quality and their resultant impact on health and the environment. Governments, with the support of international agencies, should:

a. Develop and apply methodologies for country-level waste monitoring;

b. Undertake data gathering and analysis, establish national goals and monitor progress;

c. Utilize data to assess environmental soundness of national waste policies as a basis for corrective action;

d. Input information into global information systems.

(c) International and regional cooperation and coordination

21.12. The United Nations and intergovernmental organizations, with the collaboration of Governments, should help promote waste minimization by facilitating greater exchange of information, know-how and experience. The following is a non-exhaustive list of specific activities that could be undertaken:

a. Identifying, developing and harmonizing methodologies for waste monitoring and transferring such methodologies to countries;

b. Identifying and further developing the activities of existing information networks on clean technologies and waste minimization;

c. Undertaking periodic assessment, collating and analysing country data and reporting systematically, in an appropriate United Nations forum, to the countries concerned;

d. Reviewing the effectiveness of all waste minimization instruments and identifying potential new instruments that could be used and techniques by which they could be made operational at the country level. Guidelines and codes of practice should be developed;

e. Undertaking research on the social and economic impacts of waste minimization at the consumer level.

Means of implementation

(a) Financing and cost evaluation

21.13. The Conference secretariat suggests that industrialized countries should consider investing in waste minimization the equivalent of about 1 per cent of the expenditures on solid wastes and sewage disposal. At current levels, this would amount to about $6.5 billion annually, including about $1.8 billion related to minimizing municipal solid wastes. Actual amounts would be determined by relevant municipal, provincial and national budget authorities based on local circumstances.

(b) Scientific and technological means

21.14. Waste minimization technologies and procedures will need to be identified and widely disseminated. This work should be coordinated by national Governments, with the cooperation and collaboration of non-governmental organizations, research institutions and appropriate organizations of the United Nations, and could include the following:

a. Undertaking a continuous review of the effectiveness of all waste minimization instruments and identifying potential new instruments that could be used and techniques by which instruments could be made operational at the country level. Guidelines and codes of practice should be developed;

b. Promoting waste prevention and minimization as the principal objective of national waste management programmes;

c. Promoting public education and a range of regulatory and non-regulatory incentives to encourage industry to change product design and reduce industrial process wastes through cleaner production technologies and good housekeeping practices and to encourage industries and consumers to use types of packaging that can be safely reused;

d. Executing, in accordance with national capacities, demonstration and pilot programmes to optimize waste minimization instruments;

e. Establishing procedures for adequate transport, storage, conservation and management of agricultural products, foodstuffs and other perishable goods in order to reduce the loss of those products, which results in the production of solid waste;

f. Facilitating the transfer of waste-reduction technologies to industry, particularly in developing countries, and establishing concrete national standards for effluents and solid waste, taking into account, inter alia, raw material use and energy consumption.

(c) Human resource development

21.15. Human resource development for waste minimization not only should be targeted at professionals in the waste management sector but also should seek to obtain the support of citizens and industry. Human resource development programmes must therefore aim to raise consciousness and educate and inform concerned groups and the public in general. Countries should incorporate within school curricula, where appropriate, the principles and practices of preventing and minimizing wastes and material on the environmental impacts of waste.

B. Maximizing environmentally sound waste reuse and recycling

Basis for action

21.16. The exhaustion of traditional disposal sites, stricter environmental controls governing waste disposal and increasing quantities of more persistent wastes, particularly in industrialized countries, have all contributed t o a rapid increase in the cost of waste disposal services. Costs could double or triple by the end of the decade. Some current disposal practices pose a threat to the environment. As the economics of waste disposal services change, waste recycling and resource recovery are becoming increasingly cost-effective. Future waste management programmes should take maximum advantage of resource-efficient approaches to the control of wastes. These activities should be carried out in conjunction with public education programmes. It is important that markets for products from reclaimed materials be identified in the development of reuse and recycling programmes.

Objectives

21.17. The objectives in this area are:

a. To strengthen and increase national waste reuse and recycling systems;

b. To create a model internal waste reuse and recycling programme for waste streams, including paper, within the United Nations system;

c. To make available information, techniques and appropriate policy instruments to encourage and make operational waste reuse and recycling schemes.

21.18. Governments, according to their capacities and available resources and with the cooperation of theUnited Nations  and other relevant organizations, as appropriate, should:

a. By the year 2000, promote sufficient financial and technological capacities at the regional, national and local levels, as appropriate, to implement waste reuse and recycling policies and actions;

b. By the year 2000, in all industrialized countries, and by the year 2010, in all developing countries, have a national programme, including, to the extent possible, targets for efficient waste reuse and recycling.

Activities

(a) Management-related activities

21.19. Governments and institutions and non-governmental organizations, including consumer, women’s and youth groups, in collaboration with appropriate organizations of the United Nations system, should launch programmes to demonstrate and make operational enhanced waste reuse and recycling. These programmes should, wherever possible, build upon existing or planned activities and should:

a. Develop and strengthen national capacity to reuse and recycle an increasing proportion of wastes;

b. Review and reform national waste policies to provide incentives for waste reuse and recycling;

c. Develop and implement national plans for waste management that take advantage of, and give priority to, waste reuse and recycling;

d. Modify existing standards or purchase specifications to avoid discrimination against recycled materials, taking into account the saving in energy and raw materials;

e. Develop public education and awareness programmes to promote the use of recycled products.

(b) Data and information

21.20. Information and research is required to identify promising socially acceptable and cost-effective forms of waste reuse and recycling relevant to each country. For example, supporting activities undertaken by national and local governments in collaboration with the United Nations and other international organizations could include:

a. Undertaking an extensive review of options and techniques for reuse and recycling all forms of municipal solid wastes. Policies for reuse and recycling should be made an integral component of national and local waste management programmes;

b. Assessing the extent and practice of waste reuse and recycling operations currently undertaken and identifying ways by which these could be increased and supported;

c. Increasing funding for research pilot programmes to test various options for reuse and recycling, including the use of small-scale, cottage-based recycling industries; compost production; treated waste-water irrigation; and energy recovery from wastes;

d. Producing guidelines and best practices for waste reuse and recycling;

e. Intensifying efforts, at collecting, analysing and disseminating, to key target groups, relevant information on waste issues. Special research grants could be made available on a competitive basis for innovative research projects on recycling techniques;

f. Identifying potential markets for recycled products.

(c) International and regional cooperation and coordination

21.21. States, through bilateral and multilateral cooperation, including through the United Nations and other relevant international organizations, as appropriate, should:

a. Undertake a periodic review of the extent to which countries reuse and recycle their wastes;

b. Review the effectiveness of techniques for and approaches to waste reuse and recycling and ways of enhancing their application in countries;

c. Review and update international guidelines for the safe reuse of wastes;

d. Establish appropriate programmes to support small communities’ waste reuse and recycling industries in developing countries.

Means of implementation

(a) Financing and cost evaluation

21.22. The Conference secretariat has estimated that if the equivalent of 1 per cent of waste-related municipal expenditures was devoted to safe waste reuse schemes, worldwide expenditures for this purpose would amount to $8 billion. The secretariat estimates the total annual cost (1993-2000) of implementing the activities of this programme area in developing countries to be about $850 million on grant or concessional terms. These are indicative and order-of-magnitude estimates only and have not been reviewed by Governments. Actual costs and financial terms, including any that are nonconcessional, will depend upon, inter alia, the specific programmes proposed by international institutions and approved by their governing bodies.

(b) Scientific and technological means

21.23. The transfer of technology should support waste recycling and reuse by the following means:

a. Including the transfer of recycling technologies, such as machinery for reusing plastics, rubber and paper, within bilateral and multilateral technical cooperation and aid programmes;

b. Developing and improving existing technologies, especially indigenous technologies, and facilitating their transfer under ongoing regional and interregional technical assistance programmes;

c. Facilitating the transfer of waste reuse and recycling technology.

21.24. Incentives for waste reuse and recycling are numerous. Countries could consider the following options to encourage industry, institutions, commercial establishments and individuals to recycle wastes instead of disposing of them:

a. Offering incentives to local and municipal authorities that recycle the maximum proportion of their wastes;

b. Providing technical assistance to informal waste reuse and recycling operations;

c. Applying economic and regulatory instruments, including tax incentives, to support the principle that generators of wastes pay for their disposal;

d. Providing legal and economic conditions conducive to investments in waste reuse and recycling;

e. Implementing specific mechanisms such as deposit/refund systems as incentives for reuse and recycling;

f. Promoting the separate collection of recyclable parts of household wastes;

g. Providing incentives to improve the marketability of technically recyclable waste;

h. Encouraging the use of recyclable materials, particularly in packaging, where feasible;

i. Encouraging the development of markets for recycled goods by establishing programmes.

(c) Human resource development

21.25. Training will be required to reorient current waste management practices to include waste reuse and recycling. Governments, in collaboration with United Nations international and regional organizations, should undertake the following indicative list of actions:

a. Including waste reuse and recycling in in-service training programmes as integral components of technical cooperation programmes on urban management and infrastructure development;

b. Expanding training programmes on water supply and sanitation to incorporate techniques and policies for waste reuse and recycling;

c. Including the advantages and civic obligations associated with waste reuse and recycling in school curricula and relevant general educational courses;

d. Encouraging non-governmental organizations, community-based organizations and women’s, youth and public interest group programmes, in collaboration with local municipal authorities, to mobilize community support for waste reuse and recycling through focused community-level campaigns.

(d) Capacity-building

21.26. Capacity-building to support increased waste reuse and recycling should focus on the following areas:

a. Making operational national policies and incentives for waste management;

b. Enabling local and municipal authorities to mobilize community support for waste reuse and recycling by involving and assisting informal sector waste reuse and recycling operations and undertaking waste management planning that incorporates resource recovery practices.

C. Promoting environmentally sound waste disposal and treatment

Basis for action

21.27. Even when wastes are minimized, some wastes will still remain. Even after treatment, all discharges of wastes have some residual impact on the receiving environment. Consequently, there is scope for improving waste treatment and disposal practices such as, for example, avoiding the discharge of sludges at sea. In developing countries, the problem is of a more fundamental nature: less than 10 per cent of urban wastes receive some form of treatment and only a small proportion of treatment is in compliance with any acceptable quality standard. Faecal matter treatment and disposal should be accorded due priority given the potential threat of faeces to human health.

Objectives

21.28. The objective in this area is to treat and safely dispose of a progressively increasing proportion of the generated wastes.

21.29. Governments, according to their capacities and available resources and with the cooperation of the United Nations and other relevant organizations, as appropriate, should:

a. By the year 2000, establish waste treatment and disposal quality criteria, objectives and standards based on the nature and assimilative capacity of the receiving environment;

b. By the year 2000, establish sufficient capacity to undertake waste-related pollution impact monitoring and conduct regular surveillance, including epidemiological surveillance, where appropriate;

c. By the year 1995, in industrialized countries, and by the year 2005, in developing countries, ensure that at least 50 per cent of all sewage, waste waters and solid wastes are treated or disposed of in conformity with national or international environmental and health quality guidelines;

d. By the year 2025, dispose of all sewage, waste waters and solid wastes in conformity with national or international environmental quality guidelines.

Activities

(a) Management-related activities

21.30. Governments, institutions and non-governmental organizations, together with industries , in collaboration with appropriate organizations of the United Nations system, should launch programmes to improve the control and management of waste-related pollution. These programmes should, wherever possible, build upon existing or planned activities and should:

a. Develop and strengthen national capacity to treat and safely dispose of wastes;

b. Review and reform national waste management policies to gain control over wasterelated pollution;

c. Encourage countries to seek waste disposal solutions within their sovereign territory and as close as possible to the sources of origin that are compatible with environmentally sound and efficient management. In a number of countries, transboundary movements take place to ensure that wastes are managed in an environmentally sound and efficient way. Such movements observe the relevant conventions, including those that apply to areas that are not under national jurisdiction;

d. Develop human wastes management plans, giving due attention to the development and application of appropriate technologies and the availability of resources for implementation.

(b) Data and information

21.31. Standard setting and monitoring are two key elements essential for gaining control over wasterelated pollution. The following specific activities are indicative of the kind of supportive actions that could be taken by international bodies such as the United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat), the United Nations Environment Programme and the World Health Organization:

a. Assembling and analysing the scientific evidence and pollution impacts of wastes in the environment in order to formulate and disseminate recommended scientific criteria and guidelines for the environmentally sound management of solid wastes;

b. Recommending national and, where relevant, local environmental quality standards based on scientific criteria and guidelines;

c. Including within technical cooperation programmes and agreements the provision for monitoring equipment and for the requisite training in its use;

d. Establishing an information clearing-house with extensive networks at the regional, national and local levels to collect and disseminate information on all aspects of waste management, including safe disposal.

(c) International and regional cooperation and coordination

21.32. States, through bilateral and multilateral cooperation, including through the United Nations and other relevant international organizations, as appropriate, should:

a. Identify, develop and harmonize methodologies and environmental quality and health guidelines for safe waste discharge and disposal;

b. Review and keep abreast of developments and disseminate information on the effectiveness of techniques and approaches to safe waste disposal and ways of supporting their application in countries.

Means of implementation

(a) Financing and cost evaluation

21.33. Safe waste disposal programmes are relevant to both developed and developing countries. In developed countries the focus is on improving facilities to meet higher environmental quality criteria, while in developing countries considerable investment is required to build new treatment facilities.

21.34. The Conference secretariat has estimated the average total annual cost (1993-2000) of implementing the activities of this programme in developing countries to be about $15 billion, including about $3.4 billion from the international community on grant or concessional terms. These are indicative and order-of-magnitude estimates only and have not been reviewed by Governments. Actual costs and financial terms, including any that are non-concessional, will depend upon, inter alia, the specific strategies and programmes Governments decide upon for implementation.

(b) Scientific and technological means

21.35. Scientific guidelines and research on various aspects of waste-related pollution control will be crucial for achieving the objectives of this programme. Governments, municipalities and local authorities, with appropriate international cooperation, should:

a. Prepare guidelines and technical reports on subjects such as the integration of land-use planning in human settlements with waste disposal, environmental quality criteria and standards, waste treatment and safe disposal options, industrial waste treatment and landfill operations;

b. Undertake research on critical subjects such as low-cost, low-maintenance waste-water treatment systems; safe sludge disposal options; industrial waste treatment; and lowtechnology, ecologically safe waste disposal options;

c. Transfer technologies, in conformity with the terms as well as the p rovisions of chapter 34 (Transfer of environmentally sound technology, cooperation and capacity-building), on industrial waste treatment processes through bilateral nad multilateral technical cooperation programmes and in cooperation with business and industry, including large and transnational corporations, as appropriate.

d. Focus on the rehabilitation, operation and maintenance of existing facilities and technical assistance on improved maintenance practices and techniques followed by the planning and construction of waste treatment facilities;

e. Establish programmes to maximize the source segregation and safe disposal of the hazardous components of municipal solid waste;

f. Ensure the investment and provision of waste collection facilities with the concomitant provision of water services and with an equal and parallel investment and provision of waste treatment facilities.

(c) Human resource development

21.36. Training would be required to improve current waste management practices to include safe collection and waste disposal. The following is an indicative list of actions that should be taken by Governments, in collaboration with international organizations:

a. Providing both formal and in-service training, focused on pollution control, waste treatment and disposal technologies, and operating and maintaining waste-related infrastructure. Intercountry staff exchange programmes should also be established;

b. Undertaking the requisite training for waste-related pollution monitoring and control enforcement.

(d) Capacity-building

21.37. Institutional reforms and capacity-building will be indispensable if countries are to be able to quantify and mitigate waste-related pollution. Activities to achieve this objective should include:

a. Creating and strengthening independent environmental control bodies at the national and local levels. International organizations and donors should support needed upgrading of manpower skills and provision of equipment;

b. Empowering of pollution control agencies with the requisite legal mandate and financial capacities to carry out their duties effectively.

D. Extending waste service coverage

Basis for action

21.38. By the end of the century, over 2.0 billion people will be without access to basic sanitation, and anestimated half of the urban population in developing countries will be without adequate solid waste disposal services. As many as 5.2 million people, including 4 million children under five years of age, die each year from waste-related diseases. The health impacts are particularly severe for the urban poor. The health and environmental impacts of inadequate waste management, however, go beyond the unserved settlements themselves and result in water, land and air contamination and pollution over a wider area. Extending and improving waste collection and safe disposal services are crucial to gaining control over this form of pollution.

Objectives

21.39. The overall objective of this programme is to provide health-protecting, environmentally safe waste collection and disposal services to all people. Governments, according to their capacities and available resources and with the cooperation of the United Nations and other relevant organizations, as appropriate, should:

a. By the year 2000, have the necessary technical, financial and human resource capacity to provide waste collection services commensurate with needs;

b. By the year 2025, provide all urban populations with adequate waste services;

c. By the year 2025, ensure that full urban waste service coverage is maintained and sanitation coverage achieved in all rural areas.

Activities

(a) Management-related activities

21.40. Governments, according to their capacities and available resources and with the cooperation of the United Nations and other relevant organizations, as appropriate, should:

a. Establish financing mechanisms for waste management service development in deprived areas, including appropriate modes of revenue generation;

b. Apply the “polluter pays” principle, where appropriate, by setting waste management charges at rates that reflect the costs of providing the service and ensure that those who generate the wastes pay the full cost of disposal in an environmentally safe way;

c. Encourage institutionalization of communities’ participation in planning and implementation procedures for solid waste management.

(b) Data and information

21.41. Governments, in collaboration with the United Nations and international organizations, should undertake the following:

a. Developing and applying methodologies for waste monitoring;

b. Data gathering and analysis to establish goals and monitor progress;

c. Inputting information into a global information system building upon existing systems;

d. Strengthening the activities of existing information networks in order to disseminate focused information on the application of innovative and low-cost alternatives for waste disposal to targeted audiences.

(c) International and regional cooperation and coordination

21.42. Many United Nations and bilateral programmes exist that seek to provide water supply and sanitation services to the unserved. The Water and Sanitation Collaborative Council, a global forum, currently acts to coordinate development and encourage cooperation. Even so, given the everincreasing numbers of unserved urban poor populations and the need to address, in addition, the problem of solid waste disposal, additional mechanisms are essential to ensure accelerated coverage of urban waste disposal services. The international community in general and selected United Nations organizations in particular should:

a. Launch a settlement infrastructure and environment programme following the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development to coordinate the activities of all organizations of the United Nations system involved in this area and include a clearinghouse for information dissemination on all waste management issues;

b. Undertake and systematically report on progress in providing waste services to those without such services;

c. Review the effectiveness of techniques for and approaches to increasing coverage and identify innovative ways of accelerating the process.

Means of implementation

(a) Financing and cost evaluation

21.43. The Conference secretariat has estimated the average total annual cost (1993-2000) of implementing the activities of this programme to be about $7.5 billion, including about $2.6 billion from the international community on grant or concessional terms. These are indicative and order-ofmagnitude estimates only and have not been reviewed by Governments. Actual costs and financial terms, including any that are non-concessional, will depend upon, inter alia, the specific strategies and programmes Governments decide upon for implementation.

(b) Scientific and technological means

21.44. Governments and institutions, together with non-governmental organizations, should, in collaboration with appropriate organizations of the United Nations system, launch programmes in different parts of the developing world to extend waste services to the unserved populations. These programmes should, wherever possible, build upon and reorient existing or planned activities.

21.45. Policy changes at the national and local levels could enhance the rate of waste service coverage extension. These changes should include the following:

a. Giving full recognition to and using the full range of low-cost options for waste management, including, where appropriate, their institutionalization and incorporation within codes of practice and regulation;

b. Assigning high priority to the extension of waste management services, as necessary and appropriate, to all settlements irrespective of their legal status, giving due emphasis to meeting the waste disposal needs of the unserved, especially the unserved urban poor;

c. Integrating the provision and maintenance of waste management services with other basic services such as water-supply and storm-water drainage.

21.46. Research activities could be enhanced. Countries, in cooperation with appropriate international organizations and non-governmental organizations, should, for instance:

a. Find solutions and equipment for managing wastes in areas of concentrated populations and on small islands. In particular, there is a need for appropriate refuse storage and collection systems and cost-effective and hygienic human waste disposal options;

b. Prepare and disseminate guidelines, case-studies, policy reviews and technical reports on appropriate solutions and modes of service delivery to unserved low-income areas;

c. Launch campaigns to encourage active community participation involving women’s and youth groups in the management of waste, particularly household waste;

d. Promote intercountry transfer of relevant technologies, especially technologies for highdensity settlements.

(c) Human resource development

21.47. International organizations and national and local Governments, in collaboration with nongovernmentalorganizations, should provide focused training on low-cost waste collection and disposal options, particularly techniques for their planning and delivery. Intercountry staff exchange programmes among developing countries could form part of such training. Particular attention should be given to upgrading the status and skills of management -level personnel in waste management agencies.

21.48. Improvements in management techniques are likely to yield the greatest returns in terms of improving waste management service efficiency. The United Nations, international organizations and financial institutions should, in collaboration with national and local Governments, develop and render operational management information systems for municipal record keeping and accounting and for efficiency and effectiveness assessment.

(d) Capacity-building

21.49. Governments, institutions and non-governmental organizations, with the collaboration ofappropriate organizations of the United Nations system, should develop capacities to implement programmes to provide waste collection and disposal services to the unserved populations. Some activities under the programmes should include the following:

a. Establishing a special unit within current institutional arrangements to plan and deliver services to the unserved poor communities, with their involvement and participation;

b. Making revisions to existing codes and regulations to permit the use of the full range of low-cost alternative technologies for waste disposal;

c. Building institutional capacity and developing procedures for undertaking service planning and delivery.

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Entire United Nations Agenda 21 may be viewed here:  Agenda21

Agenda 21 – Chapter 25

CHILDREN AND YOUTH IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

25.1. Youth comprise nearly 30 per cent of the world’s population. The involvement of today’s youth in environment and development decision-making and in the implementation of programmes is critical to the long-term success of Agenda 21.

PROGRAMME AREAS

A. Advancing the role of youth and actively involving them in the protection of the environment and the promotion of economic and social development Basis for action

25.2. It is imperative that youth from all parts of the world participate actively in all relevant levels of decision-making processes because it affects their lives today and has implications for their futures. In addition to their intellectual contribution and their ability to mobilize support, they bring unique perspectives that need to be taken into account.

25.3. Numerous actions and recommendations within the international community have been proposed to ensure that youth are provided a secure and healthy future, including an environment of quality, improved standards of living and access to education and employment. These issues need to be addressed in development planning.

Objectives

25.4. Each country should, in consultation with its youth communities, establish a process to promote dialogue between the youth community and Government at all levels and to establish mechanisms that permit youth access to information and provide them with the opportunity to present their perspectives on government decisions, including the implementation of Agenda 21.

25.5. Each country, by the year 2000, should ensure that more than 50 per cent of its youth, gender balanced, are enrolled in or have access to appropriate secondary education or equivalent educational or vocational training programmes by increasing participation and access rates on an annual basis.

25.6. Each country should undertake initiatives aimed at reducing current levels of youth unemployment, particularly where they are disproportionately high in comparison to the overall unemployment rate.

25.7. Each country and the United Nations should support the promotion and creation of mechanisms to involve youth representation in all United Nations processes in order to influence those processes.

25.8. Each country should combat human rights abuses against young people, particularly young women and girls, and should consider providing all youth with legal protection, skills, opportunities and the support necessary for them to fulfil their personal, economic and social aspirations and potentials.

Activities

25.9. Governments, according to their strategies, should take measures to:

a. Establish procedures allowing for consultation and possible participation of youth of both genders, by 1993, in decision-making processes with regard to the environment, involving youth at the local, national and regional levels;

b. Promote dialogue with youth organizations regarding the drafting and evaluation of environment plans and programmes or questions on development;

c. Consider for incorporation into relevant policies the recommendations of international, regional and local youth conferences and other forums that offer youth perspectives on social and economic development and resource management;

d. Ensure access for all youth to all types of education, wherever appropriate, providing alternative learning structures, ensure that education reflects the economic and social needs of youth and incorporates the concepts of environmental awareness and sustainable development throughout the curricula; and expand vocational training, implementing innovative methods aimed at increasing practical skills, such as environmental scouting;

e. In cooperation with relevant ministries and organizations, including representatives of youth, develop and implement strategies for creating alternative employment opportunities and provide required training to young men and women;

f. Establish task forces that include youth and youth non-governmental organizations to develop educational and awareness programmes specifically targeted to the youth population on critical issues pertaining to youth. These task forces should use formal and non-formal educational methods to reach a maximum audience. National and local media, non-governmental organizations, businesses and other organizations should assist in these task forces;

g. Give support to programmes, projects, networks, national organizations and youth nongovernmental organizations to examine the integration of programmes in relation to their project requirements, encouraging the involvement of youth in project identification, design, implementation and follow-up;

h. Include youth representatives in their delegations to international meetings, in accordance with the relevant General Assembly resolutions adopted in 1968, 1977, 1985 and 1989.

25.10. The United Nations and international organizations with youth programmes should take measures to:

a. Review their youth programmes and consider how coordination between them can be enhanced;

b. Improve the dissemination of relevant information to governments, youth organizations and other non-governmental organizations on current youth positions and activities, and monitor and evaluate the application of Agenda 21;

c. Promote the United Nations Trust Fund for the International Youth Year and collaborate with youth representatives in the administration of it, focusing particularly on the needs of youth from developing countries.

Means of implementation

Financing and cost evaluation

25.11. The Conference secretariat has estimated the average total annual cost (1993-2000) of implementing the activities of this programme to be about $1.5 million on grant or concessional terms. These are indicative and order-of-magnitude estimates only and have not been reviewed by Governments. Actual costs and financial terms, including any that are non-concessional, will depend upon, inter alia, the specific strategies and programmes Governments decide upon for implementation.

B. Children in sustainable development Basis for action

25.12. Children not only will inherit the responsibility of looking after the Earth, but in many developing countries they comprise nearly half the population. Furthermore, children in both developing and industrialized countries are highly vulnerable to the effects of environmental degradation. They are also highly aware supporters of environmental thinking. The specific interests of children need to be taken fully into account in the participatory process on environment and development in order to safeguard the future sustainability of any actions taken to improve the environment.

Objectives

25.13. National governments, according to their policies, should take measures to:

a. Ensure the survival, protection and development of children, in accordance with the goals endorsed by the 1990 World Summit for Children (A/45/625, annex);

b. Ensure that the interests of children are taken fully into account in the participatory process for sustainable development and environmental improvement.

Activities

25.14. Governments should take active steps to:

a. Implement programmes for children designed to reach the child-related goals of the 1990s in the areas of environment and development, especially health, nutrition, education, literacy and poverty alleviation;

b. Ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child (General Assembly resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989, annex), at the earliest moment and implement it by addressing the basic needs of youth and children;

c. Promote primary environmental care activities that address the basic needs of communities, improve the environment for children at the household and community level and encourage the participation and empowerment of local populations, including women, youth, children and indigenous people, towards the objective of integrated community management of resources, especially in developing countries;

d. Expand educational opportunities for children and youth, including education for environmental and developmental responsibility, with overriding attention to the education of the girl child;

e. Mobilize communities through schools and local health centres so that children and their parents become effective focal points for sensitization of communities to environmental issues;

f. Establish procedures to incorporate children’s concerns into all relevant policies and strategies for environment and development at the local, regional and national levels, including those concerning allocation of and entitlement to natural resources, housing and recreation needs, and control of pollution and toxicity in both rural and urban areas.

25-15. International and regional organizations should cooperate and coordinate in the proposed areas. UNICEF should maintain cooperation and collaboration with other organizations of the United Nations, Governments and non-governmental organizations to develop programmes for children and programmes to mobilize children in the activities outlined above.

Means of implementation

(a) Financing and cost evaluation

25.16. Financing requirements for most of the activities are included in estimates for other programmes.

(b) Human resource development and capacity-building

25.17. The activities should facilitate capacity-building and training activities already contained in other chapters of Agenda 21.

Entire United Nations Agenda 21 may be viewed here:  Agenda21

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Basis of the previous posting.  The presenter sourced information from the book he authored.

http://www.tatepublishing.com/bookstore/book.php?w=978-1-61346-408-3

Hedke - The Audacity of Freedom-Final.indd

The Audacity of Freedom by Dennis Hedke

Natural-born U.S. citizen, geophysicist, member of the Kansas House of Representatives, husband, father, veteran, and unapologetic supporter of the U.S. Constitution, author Dennis Hedke mounts an unequivocal challenge to the Socialist-Marxist-Communist principles being pushed upon freedom loving Americans by entities and individuals both within and outside the United States.

Recognizing the incredible encroachment on multiple tracks against the principles espoused by our Founding Fathers, the author provides factual content relating to our already relinquished freedoms, and significant insight as to where to apply pressure to restore those recoverable losses.

Parties most influential in and around the Obama Administration, foreign policy, energy policy, environmental and fiscal policy issues are examined, with substantive recommendations toward the enhancement of the America of the future.

With Foreword by Kansas Speaker of the House, Representative Mike O’Neal

Individuals questioning the ‘green movement’ or Israel’s place in current political and spiritual discussion will find a wealth of answers in The Audacity of Freedom. Dennis Hedke’s straightforward and unapologetic plunge into this debate offers the best of science and periodic Biblical underpinning in leading readers to logical and eye-opening conclusions.

David E. Welsh

Senior Pastor

Central Christian

Wichita, KS

Hedke defends the very basis upon which these United States were founded against those who would seek to control a free people through fundamental and fashionable change. He simply educates with an intellectual honesty so often lacking in those purportedly acting for the benefit of Americans.

Dr. Donald Vasquez ER Surgeon

Wichita, KS

268 pages – $19.99 (paperback)

This book is also available for purchase as an eBook download.

Welcome to the world of eBooks where instead of receiving a physical paper book in the mail, you will receive access to the eBook file for this complete book. Within minutes you can be reading this book on your computer, PDA, cellphone or a stand-alone eBook reader—at a reduced cost! Unless otherwise noted, all eBooks are in the PDF format which is compatible with most eBook readers including Sony Reader, Nook, Kindle 2, iPad, and iPhone 4. Click the “Order Online” button below to purchase this eBook download today!

$13.99 (digital download)

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All files © 2004-2013 Tate Publishing & Enterprises, LLC. Tate Publishing and its logo are trademarked by Tate Publishing & Enterprises, LLC. No portion of this page may be duplicated, copied, or used in any manner without expressed written consent of Tate Publishing & Enterprises, LLC under penalty of law.

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Excerpts of a power point presentation by Dennis Hedke, a Consulting Geophysicist by profession,  Member of The Kansas House of Representatives and Chairman of the Energy and Environment Committee.

The entire presentation may be viewed here: SunflowerClub-JCRP-4-18-2013

Click on image to enlarge.

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4.18.13.5 4.18.13.6 4.18.13.7 4.18.13.8

Entire presentation may be viewed here: SunflowerClub-JCRP-4-18-2013

Additional reading http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_age

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